Ansicht umschalten
Avatar von sorrento
  • sorrento

624 Beiträge seit 13.01.2003

Der olle Wahlfälscher Chuck Hagel im Kabinett, lol


http://www.heise.de/tp/foren/S-Einen-sehr-interessanten-Artikel-dazu-gibt-es-auch-hier/forum-47558/msg-4250262/spm-eNqrViosTS2qVLJScs4oTc5W8EhMT81RKM4vKkrNK8lX0lHKT0srTi0Byhso1QIAZuwPIQ702b0f/read/



http://www.heise.de/tp/foren/S-Ich-erinnere-an-Chuck-Hagel-Senator-und-ex-Vorsitzender-von-ES-S/forum-45383/msg-3874372/read/


Chuck Hagel,
der Senator von Nebraska, ex-Vorsitzender der Wahlmaschinennfirma
ES&S:

"Maybe Nebraska Republican Chuck Hagel honestly won two US Senate
elections. Maybe it's true that the citizens of Georgia simply
decided that incumbent Democratic Senator Max Cleland, a wildly
popular war veteran who lost three limbs in Vietnam, was, as his
successful Republican challenger suggested in his campaign ads, too
unpatriotic to remain in the Senate. Maybe George W. Bush, Alabama's
new Republican governor Bob Riley, and a small but congressionally
decisive handful of other long-shot Republican candidates really did
win those states where conventional wisdom and straw polls showed
them losing in the last few election cycles.

...Perhaps it's just a coincidence that the sudden rise of inaccurate
exit polls happened around the same time corporate-programmed,
computer-controlled, modem-capable voting machines began recording
and tabulating ballots.

But if any of this is true, there's not much of a paper trail from
the voters' hand to prove it.

You'd think in an open democracy that the government - answerable to
all its citizens rather than a handful of corporate officers and
stockholders - would program, repair, and control the voting
machines. You'd think the computers that handle our cherished ballots
would be open and their software and programming available for public
scrutiny. You'd think there would be a paper trail of the vote, which
could be followed and audited if a there was evidence of voting fraud
or if exit polls disagreed with computerized vote counts.

You'd be wrong.

The respected Washington, DC publication The Hill has confirmed that
former conservative radio talk-show host and now Republican U.S.
Senator Chuck Hagel was the head of, and continues to own part
interest in, the company that owns the company that installed,
programmed, and largely ran the voting machines that were used by
most of the citizens of Nebraska.

Back when Hagel first ran there for the U.S. Senate in 1996, his
company's computer-controlled voting machines showed he'd won
stunning upsets in both the primaries and the general election. The
Washington Post (1/13/1997) said Hagel's "Senate victory against an
incumbent Democratic governor was the major Republican upset in the
November election." According to Bev Harris of
www.blackboxvoting.com, Hagel won virtually every demographic group,
including many largely Black communities that had never before voted
Republican. Hagel was the first Republican in 24 years to win a
Senate seat in Nebraska....

Back when Hagel first ran there for the U.S. Senate in 1996, his
company's computer-controlled voting machines showed he'd won
stunning upsets in both the primaries and the general election. The
Washington Post (1/13/1997) said Hagel's "Senate victory against an
incumbent Democratic governor was the major Republican upset in the
November election." According to Bev Harris of
www.blackboxvoting.com, Hagel won virtually every demographic group,
including many largely Black communities that had never before voted
Republican. Hagel was the first Republican in 24 years to win a
Senate seat in Nebraska.

Six years later Hagel ran again, this time against Democrat Charlie
Matulka in 2002, and won in a landslide. As his website says, Hagel
"was re-elected to his second term in the United States Senate on
November 5, 2002 with 83 percent of the vote. That represents the
biggest political victory in the history of Nebraska."

What Hagel's website fails to disclose is that about 80 percent of
those votes were counted by computer-controlled voting machines put
in place by the company affiliated with Hagel. Built by that company.
Programmed by that company.

"This is a big story, bigger than Watergate ever was," said Hagel's
Democratic opponent in the 2002 Senate race, Charlie Matulka. "They
say Hagel shocked the world, but he didn't shock me."

Is Matulka the sore loser the Hagel campaign paints him as, or is he
democracy's proverbial canary in the mineshaft?

In Georgia, Democratic incumbent and war-hero Max Cleland was
defeated by Saxby Chambliss, who'd avoided service in Vietnam with a
"medical deferment" but ran his campaign on the theme that he was
more patriotic than Cleland. While many in Georgia expected a big win
by Cleland, the computerized voting machines said that Chambliss had
won.

The BBC summed up Georgia voters' reaction in a 6 November 2002
headline: "GEORGIA UPSET STUNS DEMOCRATS." The BBC echoed the
confusion of many Georgia voters when they wrote, "Mr. Cleland - an
army veteran who lost three limbs in a grenade explosion during the
Vietnam War - had long been considered 'untouchable' on questions of
defense and national security." ....Bev Harris has looked into the
situation in depth and thinks Matulka may be on to something. The
company tied to Hagel even threatened her with legal action when she
went public about his company having built the machines that counted
his landslide votes.

"I suspect they're getting ready to do this all across all the
states," Matulka said in a January 30, 2003 interview. "God help us
if Bush gets his touch screens all across the country," he added,
"because they leave no paper trail. These corporations are taking
over America, and they just about have control of our voting
machines." ...

"I suspect they're getting ready to do this all across all the
states," Matulka said in a January 30, 2003 interview. "God help us
if Bush gets his touch screens all across the country," he added,
"because they leave no paper trail. These corporations are taking
over America, and they just about have control of our voting
machines."

In the meantime, exit-polling organizations have quietly gone out of
business, and the news arms of the huge multinational corporations
that own our networks are suggesting the days of exit polls are over.
Virtually none were reported in 2002, creating an odd and unsettling
silence that caused unease for the many American voters who had come
to view exit polls as proof of the integrity of their election
systems...

Meanwhile, back in Nebraska, Charlie Matulka had requested a hand
count of the vote in the election he lost to Hagel. He just learned
his request was denied because, he said, Nebraska has a just-passed
law that prohibits government-employee election workers from looking
at the ballots, even in a recount. The only machines permitted to
count votes in Nebraska, he said, are those made and programmed by
the corporation formerly run by Hagel.

http://www.alternet.org/story.html?StoryID=15103


Bewerten
- +
Ansicht umschalten