Avatar von Calibrator
  • Calibrator

mehr als 1000 Beiträge seit 16.03.2001

Weil es gerade so schön passt:

Quelle:
> http://www.cbc.ca/story/arts/national/2005/07/25/Arts/SonyPayola_050725.html

Sony to pay $10M in payola scandal

Mon, 25 Jul 2005 17:09:36 EDT

Sony BMG Music Entertainment will pay a $10-million settlement after
an investigation by New York's attorney general uncovered a scheme
that paid radio station employees to play certain artists.

"Radio stations are airing music because they are paid to do so in a
way that hasn't been disclosed to the public," said the state's
attorney general, Eliot Spitzer, in a news conference Monday.

Sony BMG issued a statement acknowledging some of its employees
engaged in conduct that was "wrong and improper." The company agreed
to hire a compliance officer to monitor its promotion practices.

The $10 million will be distributed to non-profit groups supporting
music education and appreciation programs in the state.

Spitzer said air time for certain artists was "determined by
undisclosed payoffs to radio stations and their employees."

Spitzer's investigators demanded documents, e-mails and other
materials from several music companies including Warner Music,
Universal Music Group and EMI as well as Sony. He warned his probe
wasn't over: "These practices are pervasive."

The attorney general said his office found evidence Sony BMG paid for
vacation packages and electronics for radio programmers. It also paid
for contest giveaways, some operational expenses and hired
independent promoters to pay radio stations to get more airplay for
its artists.

Sony BMG Music is an umbrella organization of several record labels
including Arista, Columbia and So So Def Records. Its artists include
Aretha Franklin, Celine Dion, OutKast, Pink and Sarah McLachlan.

Spitzer lauded Sony CEO Howard Stringer and other executives for
being "nothing but cooperative." About a dozen Sony BMG executives
were let go during Spitzer's 11-month investigation, according to the
Wall Street Journal.

Record companies are prohibited from offering financial inducements
to radio stations under a 1960 U.S. federal law that made it a crime
punishable by a $10,000 fine and up to a year in prison. The law was
passed in response to scandals of the 1950s and early 1960s
implicating some famous disc jockeys of the time. It was dubbed
"payola" – a combination of "pay" and "Victrola" record players.

Spitzer has been in discussions with Jonathan Adelstein, the head of
the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), about the problem.

"This is a potentially massive scandal," said Adelstein, who
expressed interest in starting his own investigation. 

Bewerten
- +
Anzeige